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South Carolina Residents Told To Look Out For Real-Life "Snakenado"

author

Rosie McCall

Staff Writer

clockSep 18 2018, 16:01 UTC

An Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake. Jay Ondreicka/Shutterstock

A “snakenado” might sound like an awful sequel to Sharknado (or should that be Sharknado 6?) but the residents of South Carolina really have been advised to watch out for potentially venomous snakes, which may be lurking in unusual places in the wake of Hurricane Florence.

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Ok, so it's not exactly a tornado but "snakerricane" doesn't have quite the same ring to it. 

This is the news that the flooding brought on by Hurricane Florence could end up displacing serpents living in habitats along the waterway, which might just mean you find a copperhead viper sneaking down the highway, a cottonmouth hiding out in your backyard, or an eastern diamondback rattlesnake exploring the local supermarket.

Thad Bowman, a wildlife expert from Alligator Adventure, an animal park in Myrtle Beach, warned the public to remain wary, Myrtle Beach Online reports. Adding, the park is preparing for the worst-case scenario as far as keeping their animals safe is concerned.

“[Venemous snakes] inject venom, which causes tissue destruction, platelet loss, causes bleeding, it can cause death,” Gerald O’Malley from Grand Strand Hospital told the paper in July. 

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The usual emergency advice applies – remain inside until public safety officials have announced it is no longer dangerous and, if possible, try not to venture out into the storm. (For more advice on what to do when there's a hurricane, click here.) If you do happen to be bitten for whatever reason, call 911 immediately. There is not much you can do on your own to survive a snake bite but a medical professional can provide you with an antidote. The earlier this is done, the better.

While venomous snakes are especially terrifying given their horror movie-worthy credentials, they are not the first animals to be swept up in a tropical storm Sharknado-style. Violent storms in Kansas and Oklahoma have been known to sweep cows off their feet and only last September, the coastal city of Tampico made headlines after officials revealed "light rain" had brought a number of small fish tumbling down from the sky. 

A venomous cottonmouth just chilling. jo Crebbin/Shuttsertock

[H/T: Myrtle Beach Online]


Nature
  • storms,

  • snakes,

  • hurricane,

  • reptiles,

  • serpent,

  • sharknado,

  • snakenado