Advertisement

humansHumans
clockPUBLISHED

Mystery Lead Sarcophagus Found Below Fire-Damaged Notre-Dame To Be Opened

author

Dr. Alfredo Carpineti

author

Dr. Alfredo Carpineti

Senior Staff Writer & Space Correspondent

Alfredo (he/him) has a PhD in Astrophysics on galaxy evolution and a Master's in Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces.

Senior Staff Writer & Space Correspondent

comments30Comments
share47.2kShares
Notre Dame was engulfed by fire in 2019. Image Credit: Jerome LABOUYRIE/Shutterstock.com

Notre Dame was engulfed by fire in 2019. Image Credit: Loic Salan/Shutterstock.com

A few weeks ago, archaeologists recovered some incredible findings that had been buried beneath the famous Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris, which famously went up in flames in 2019. Among them were several tombs and a lead sarcophagus. Researchers now intend to open it.

Remember back in 2018, when scientists decided to open an ancient Egyptian black sarcophagus much to the consternation of the entire world? We're not saying that everything bad that has happened since then is their fault, but Japan's "killing stone", said to have been holding a vengeful demon for 1,000 years, cracking open earlier this year isn't a good omen either. 

Advertisement

Among the tombs was the "completely preserved, human-shaped sarcophagus made of lead," the French culture ministry said, reports France24.

By opening the Notre-Dame sarcophagus, archaeologists hope to determine its true age, as it is believed to be from the 14th century, given that it was covered by furniture from that century. That said, it was found buried 20 meters (65 feet) underground among some 19th-century brick pipes from the older heating system, so opening it is a crucial step to confirm its origin.

-

"If it turns out that it is in fact a sarcophagus from the Middle Ages, we are dealing with an extremely rare burial practice," lead archaeologist Christophe Besnier said in a press conference, reports AFP.

The team hopes to learn all they possibly can about the deceased while remaining in compliance with French laws, as a human body is not considered an archeological object there.

After reconstruction work after the fire led to this discovery, France's national archaeological research institute, INRAP, is also now investigating the possibility of reinterment in Notre-Dame. 


ARTICLE POSTED IN

humansHumans
  • tag
  • humans

FOLLOW ONNEWSGoogele News