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spaceSpace and Physics

Can You Find All The "Easter Eggs" Hidden Inside NASA's Orion Capsule?

NASA not only delivered a successful mission, it also hid some excellent puzzles inside the capsule. Can you spot them?

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Dr. Alfredo Carpineti

Senior Staff Writer & Space Correspondent

clockDec 6 2022, 15:24 UTC
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This high-resolution image captures the inside of the Orion crew module on flight day one of the Artemis I mission. At left is Commander Moonikin Campos, a purposeful passenger equipped with sensors to collect data that will help scientists and engineers understand the deep-space environment for future Artemis missions. At center is the Callisto payload, a technology demonstration of voice-activated audio and video technology from Lockheed Martin in collaboration with Amazon and Cisco. Below and to the right of Callisto is the Artemis I zero-gravity indicator, astronaut Snoopy.
The interior of the Orion Capsule. Image Credit: NASA

Take a really good look at this picture. You’re seeing the inside of the Orion Capsule. But don’t just focus on the cool equipment, including a virtual assistant in the center – NASA has placed several easter eggs around the capsule for everyone to solve.

The space agency doesn’t specify how many things are there to find, so we had to do the sleuthing ourselves too (and we might have missed something). We also don’t have solutions just yet, just guesswork that might be more or less reasonable when it comes to their actual meaning. NASA will announce the list of puzzles and their solutions on December 10, just a day before Orion splash lands into the Pacific.

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You can find the full-resolution image of the capsule on NASA's Flickr, and below is what we have found!

SPOILERS AFTER THE PHOTO

This high-resolution image captures the inside of the Orion crew module on flight day one of the Artemis I mission. At left is Commander Moonikin Campos, a purposeful passenger equipped with sensors to collect data that will help scientists and engineers understand the deep-space environment for future Artemis missions. At center is the Callisto payload, a technology demonstration of voice-activated audio and video technology from Lockheed Martin in collaboration with Amazon and Cisco. Below and to the right of Callisto is the Artemis I zero-gravity indicator, astronaut Snoopy.
Full version of the capsule photograph. Image Credit: NASA

Dots and dashes in the center of the image – This is morse code and should be read as -.-./…./.-/.-./.-../../. and it translates to Charlie - likely a reference to Charlie Brown as Snoopy visible near the US flag is the mission mascot and microgravity indicator.

Post-It Note with Dashes And Letters – The post-it note says CBAGF and it has three equal size dashes above the first three letters, then a short above G, and the longest one above F. It is musical notation – the first five notes of “Fly Me To The Moon” written by Bart Howard for his partner of 58 years, Thomas Fowler.

Red(?) Bird Sticker – We think that this is an eagle, a reference to the Eagle, the Lunar Module that took Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the surface of the Moon. "The Eagle has landed," Armstrong told NASA on July 20, 1969.

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Number series on the wall above Snoopy – One can read this peculiar sequence. On the first line is 1, 31, 32, 33, 34, 39. On the following line starting underneath 31, there is 41, 45, 46, 47, 49. This has stumped us. We considered the possible coordinates for the reentry of Orion but this is a bit too north and a bit too west.

Do you have an answer for these last two? Have you spotted others? Share your ideas and let us know!


spaceSpace and Physics
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