Lobster Found With A Pepsi Logo Printed On Its Claw Highlights Our Polluted Oceans

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A fisherman in New Brunswick, Canada, has spotted a rather unusual lobster – one that appears to have part of the Pepsi logo tattooed on its claw.

The image of the lobster highlights the amount of junk humans are throwing into the oceans. It’s not clear how the logo ended up on the lobster.

"I can't say how he got it on," Karissa Lindstrand, a lobster fisherman who took the picture, told CBC News. "It seemed more like a tattoo or a drawing on the lobster rather than something growing into it."

The lobster was found by Lindstrand and her crew on board their boat called Honour Bound, off Grand Manan island in New Brunswick. She said she's a huge Pepsi fan, drinking up to 12 cans of the beverage every day, which can’t be too healthy. As far as we can tell, this isn’t some indirect, terrible advert for Pepsi. But you never know.

“I was like: ‘Oh, that’s a Pepsi can,’” said Lindstrand. “It looked like it was a print put right on the lobster claw.”

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Lindstrand and her crew caught the lobster on Tuesday, November 21, but they were at a loss to explain the unusual appearance of the creature. Some suggested that part of a Pepsi can or box got stuck on the lobster when it was growing. The logo itself was pixelated, however, suggesting it came from a printed picture.

The lobster was later sold, along with the other batch of lobsters that day. So some lucky punter somewhere has probably already tucked into it – and perhaps queried their waiter as to why the chef included a soda can in their dinner.

It does highlight the amount of crap we’re dumping into the oceans, though. It’s estimated that over 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic trash are in the world’s seas, and by 2050 the amount of rubbish in the ocean will outweigh the number of fish. That’s not great.

So this poor little lobster appears to be the latest victim of our plastic planet. Plastic of all sizes can be a danger to animals, who can mistake it for food. And, it seems, it can even change their appearance.

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