NASA Just Released These New Images Taken By Hubble, And They're Seriously Spectacular

Messier 106, shown, is a spiral galaxy seen previously in the Hubble Messier Catalog. NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and R. Gendler (for the Hubble Heritage Team); Acknowledgment: J. GaBany

M88 is found 47 million light-years away. It’s a spiral galaxy with well-defined and symmetrical arms. NASA, ESA, STScI and M. Stiavelli (STScI)

 

The elliptical galaxy M89 is almost exactly circular. It’s found 50 million light-years from us. NASA, ESA, STScI, and M. Franx (Universiteit Leiden) and S. Faber (University of California, Santa Cruz)

 

This bright and beautiful spiral galaxy is called M90. Found 59 million light-years away, it contains about a trillion stars. NASA, ESA, STScI, and V. Rubin (Carnegie Institution of Washington), D. Maoz (Tel Aviv University/Wise Observatory) and D. Fisher (University of Maryland)

 

M95 is a barred spiral galaxy found 33 million light-years away. Its arms play host to a large amount of star formation. NASA, ESA, STScI, and D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) and R. Chandar (University of Toledo)

 

M98 is found 44 million light-years away and has an active nucleus, meaning its core is brighter than the rest of the galaxy. NASA, ESA, STScI and V. Rubin (Carnegie Institution of Washington)

 

Also called the Surfboard galaxy, M108 is found 46 million light-years away. It gets its name from appearing edge-on with no apparent bulge or core. NASA, ESA, STScI and G. Illingworth (University of California, Santa Cruz)

 

Found 2.7 million light-years away orbiting the Andromeda galaxy, M110 is an elliptical galaxy with no arms or regions of star formation. NASA, ESA, STScI and D. Geisler (Universidad de Concepción)

 

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