Funny Or Die

It was no surprise that creationists weren’t going to love Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. Their actual response would be laughable if I wasn’t so busy slamming my head into my desk. 

On the night of the premiere, a Fox affiliate station in Oklahoma “accidentally” cut out a full 15 seconds of programming containing Tyson’s only reference to evolution that night. Instead, a promo piece about a teenage archer was played. Could this have been an honest accident? Maybe. But to make such a dumb mistake during the premiere of such a highly-anticipated series reeks of ineptitude, which isn’t that great of a defense.

Over the following weeks since the show’s premiere, many creationists effectively covered their ears, saying “La, la, la! I can’t hear you!” or have attacked the content of the show only to highlight the fact that they didn’t understand it and were closed off to learning. Now, it has hit a breaking point with Young Earth Creationists actually demanding equal air time to provide the “science” of divine creation. What would their show even look like? Thanks to the folks at Funny Or Die, we have an answer:

Creationism is not science and does not deserve equal air time when scientists are on TV. About 97% of all scientists (from all fields, including engineering, physical chemistry, and others where the age of the Earth is completely irrelevant) accept evolution. When looking at those working in the life sciences, it is virtually unanimous. While there are certain aspects of Earth’s timeline that scientists do debate, the existence of evolution or the possibility that the Grand Canyon was carved out in a matter of weeks do not make the list.

Yes, there are people who have deeply-held religious beliefs yet they also love and understand science. However, the conversation of science needs to remain with what can be observed, tested, and/or deduced from things that have been previously observed and tested. Outside of your personal life, religious convictions are actually irrelevant, and if a "belief" goes against mountains of physical evidence and testable facts, it probably needs to change.

Following the debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham this past February about evolution vs. creationism, scientists found an unlikely cheerleader in controversial televangelist Pat Robertson who had this to say to Young Earth Creationists:

“Let’s face it, there was a bishop ... who added up the dates listed in Genesis and he came up with the world had been around for 6,000 years. There ain’t no way that’s possible … To say that [geological layers and oil reserves] all came about in 6,000 years is just nonsense and I think it’s time we come off of that stuff and say 'this isn’t possible.' … We’ve got to be realistic that the dating of Bishop Ussher just doesn’t comport with anything that is found in science, and you can’t just totally deny the geological formations that are out there. … Let’s be real. Let’s not make a joke of ourselves.”

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