Celebrate 50 Years Of Humans Walking In Space With NASA

American astronaut Ed White tethered to Gemini VI. NASA

On March 18 1965, one man boldly walked where no man had walked before.

Outside the Soviet spacecraft Voskhod 2 and attached only by a tether of 5.35 meters (17.5 feet) in length, Alexey Leonov made history as the first human to walk in space.

Called an extra-vehicular activity (EVA) in NASA-talk, this landmark spacewalk was a brief stint into the unknown for the intrepid explorer at only 12 minutes and 9 seconds.

On June 3 1965, another man celebrated a world first. Emerging from America’s Gemini IV spacecraft on its third orbit, Edward White became the first American astronaut to take a saunter in space with a 23-minute-long spacewalk.

Gemini IV orbited the Earth 62 times over a 4-day mission before its descent and splashdown into the Atlantic Ocean on June 7.

These epic maiden voyages marked the first of many manned missions into space. Check out "Suit Up" below, a NASA documentary marking the 50 years of EVAs since these historic moments.

 

 

 

Comments

If you liked this story, you'll love these

This website uses cookies

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By continuing to use our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.