7 Ways To Tell If Someone Is Cheating On You

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Pay attention to social media use

content-1476283850-pay-attention-to-sociDoes your partner spend more time Snap-chatting than talking to you? Recent research suggests that people who are highly active on two other social networks — Facebook and Twitter — may be more likely to have social-media-related conflict, and subsequently more likely to experience "infidelity, breakup, and divorce." (They haven't studied Snapchat yet.)

In his study, University of Missouri researcher Russell Clayton studied the social media habits of close to 600 Twitter users. Most people used Twitter for roughly an hour a day, 5 days a week. But those who used it more often than that were more likely to get in arguments with their partners, get divorced, or cheat. The more time they spent on Twitter, the worse the relationship outcomes were.

It's unlikely that too much tweeting, posting, and liking caused other people to cheat, of course, but if anything the study showed that there's certainly a connection between the two.

 

 

Watch for sudden changes of behavior

If you've been with your significant other for a while, chances are you know how they normally act — what type of foods they eat, how they react to challenges or surprises, how well they listen, and so on.

Sudden changes in body language, from facial expressions to patterns of speech, can be red flags for duplicitous behavior, according to research from Lillian Glass, a behavioral analyst who once worked with the Federal Bureau of Investigation to study how to spot signs of deceit.

"Your body experiences these types of changes when you’re nervous and feeling tense — when you lie," she writes in her book, "The Body Language of Liars."
Image credit: BI

Look out for silence, personal attacks or repeating the question

One tell-tale sign of lying, says Glass, is a sudden inability to speak. This happens because our automatic nervous system often responds to stress by starving the mouth of saliva.

Another is veering into personal attacks rather than answering a question that's been asked, write CIA veterans Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, and Susan Carnicero in their recent book, "Spy the Lie." 

And in a study published in 2011, UCLA professor of psychology R. Edward Geiselman found that people who are lying tend to repeat questions before answering them, "perhaps to give themselves time to concoct an answer," he said in a press release.

Image credit: eliduke / Flickr 

 

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