Supersonic Car Tests Its Jet Engine Ahead Of 1,000mph World Land Speed Record Attempt

The test was performed flawlessly. Bloodhound

A supersonic car that will attempt to break the 1,600 kilometers per hour (1,000 miles per hour) limit has had a successful test run of its powerful jet engine.

Called Bloodhound SSC (Supersonic Car), the vehicle is being developed by a team from Oxford in the UK. It has been in development for years, a bold attempt to break the world land speed record.

The team is now preparing to perform a test run of the vehicle in Newquay, UK on October 26, when the car will travel at up to 320 km/h (200 mph). Prior to that, however, it has tested out its engine.

On Friday, September 29, the Rolls Royce EJ200 jet engine of the car – taken from the powerful Eurofighter Typhoon plane – roared to life. The driver of the vehicle, Andy Green, was sitting in the cockpit while the car was anchored down, testing out throttling of the engine with his right foot.

“What a fantastic ending to the end of our first week of testing," said Stuart Edmondson, Head of Engineering Operations at Bloodhound, in a statement. “Integrating a Eurofighter Typhoon jet engine into the car is a huge challenge; however, we have succeeded!”

A video of the September 29 test. Warning, it's quite loud. Bloodhound

In these upcoming tests at the end of October, the car will be using the engine to travel at the somewhat reduced speed. This is all leading up to the full test of the car, which will see it attempt to break the land speed record.

That attempt will take place at the Hakskeen Pan in the Northern Cape region of South Africa. Initially, the team had hoped for this to take place in 2018, but that looks likely to slip to 2019.

During this grand finale, it will take 55 seconds for the car to reach its top speed of 1,600 km/h (1,000 mph). It will then take a further 65 seconds to slow down using conventional disc brakes and a parachute.

If all goes to plan, it will break the existing land speed record of 763 mph (1,228 km/h), also set by Andy Green in 1997 with the Thrust SSC vehicle. This latest test, and the upcoming runs at the end of October, are important steps towards that goal.

Bloodhound will attempt to break the world land speed record in 2019. Bloodhound

 

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