The Best Signs From Last Weekend's March For Science

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 14, 2018: Participants in 2018 March for Science march to Capitol. Among demands, a call “for public officials to enact evidence-based policy that serves all communities.' bakdc/Shutterstock

Thousands of people hit the streets on Saturday, April 14, for the world’s second March for Science. Just like last year, one message was especially clear: don’t mess with a disgruntled scientist armed with duct-tape, a placard, and a felt-tip pen.

Last year was the world's first March for Science. It started as an innocent Reddit discussion between some concerned scientists in early 2017 and eventually culminated with the world’s biggest public display of support for science ever, attracting over 1.2 million people from 450 cities across the world. 

Well, a year has passed and there’s still a lot to be done: climate change deniers still rule the roost, evidence-based policymaking has continued to take a battering, and the scientific community is still not doing enough to encourage equality and diversity within its ranks.

It’s no surprise that the marchers were back with a vengeance. Although this year’s turn out was not quite as strong as the inaugural march last year, the event still saw thousands of scientists and sci-curious sympathizers taking a very public stand. The main event took place in Washington DC, with over 230 satellite demonstrations in cities across the US and around the world in Kenya, South Africa, Russia, Nigeria, Australia, Germany, the UK, India, and even Antarctica.

“The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity,” the demonstration's organizers explain in their mission statement. “We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.”

Once again, the march was also a perfect excuse for scientists to show off their gloriously nerdy and smart puns, as well as their surprisingly good sign-making skills.

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

 

Comments

If you liked this story, you'll love these

This website uses cookies

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By continuing to use our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.