Bill Nye Just Bet A Climate Change Denier $20,000 That The Earth Will Get Warmer Next Year, And Got Turned Down

Bill Nye agreed to talk to Marc Morano to dispel some myths about climate change. Youtube

It seems like climate change deniers are confident in their unfounded beliefs, as long as their money is not on the line.

Popular television presenter Bill Nye, “the science guy,” offered two $20,000 dollar bets to Marc Morano, a prominent climate change denier, but was turned down during an interview with him. The first bet was about 2016 being in the top 10 hottest years on record. The second one concerned this current decade being the hottest on record.

Morano, who is part of the conservative climate skeptic think tank Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow (CFACT) but has no formal climate science education, told Nye that he wouldn't take the bet because the results would only be what the "government agencies declared," and claimed the rise would not be significant, although his ClimateDepot website continues to claim that Earth is actually experiencing “global cooling”. Of course, any rise in temperature is significant, and perhaps most significant of all is that temperatures are continuing to rise.

Speaking to Desmog, Morano added he would not take the because it was "silly," adding it was "obvious" the official records would show more warming.

Perhaps Morano probably doesn’t want to end up like the German anti-vaxxer who was forced to pay a $106,000 bet after he challenged people to prove that measles was caused by a virus.

 

 

Above, Nye chats to Morano and proposes the bets

Billy Nye chose a bet that would be almost impossible to lose. 2015 has been the hottest year on record by a significant margin, and the first month of 2016 was hotter still. Since 2000, 14 out of the 16 years have been the hottest years on record.

Nye proposed the bets during an interview for Morano's new film "Climate Hustle," a propaganda movie for climate deniers. Climate Hustle's hypotheses go against the conclusion of universities, major science academies, and 97 percent of the world's climate scientists.

Talking to Desmog, Nye said: “From what [Mr. Morano] chose to show us, the film seems to be a series of interviews with traditional climate change deniers. As an on-camera professional, I found Mr. Morano’s performance stiff and not engaging. For me, the uneven performance added to the disingenuous and unprofessional nature of the film.”

[H/T: Desmog]

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